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Oman Air grounds 737 Max 8 jets

Oman Air has issued a notice that it will suspend the aircraft operation as soon as possible.

Oman Air

info@thearabianstories.com

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

MUSCAT: Following Oman civil aviation’s decision to suspend Boeing 737 Max 8 flying into and out of Oman airports, Oman Air has issued a notice that it will suspend the aircraft operation as soon as possible.

“We will suspend the aircraft operations as soon as possible and are making necessary arrangements to reschedule the operations and will inform the guests, if there are any cancellations,” the airline notice read.

Oman has suspended operations of Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft into and out of all Omani airports, a tweet from the country’s civil aviation authority said.

“#PACA is temporarily suspending operations of Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft into and out of all Omani airports until further notice,” the tweet read. .

The decision comes after an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Max 8 crashed on Sunday, killing 157 people on board.

On Tuesday, the Sultanate’s national carrier Oman Air said that it was ‘monitoring the situation’ on the Ethiopian Airlines crash, which involved a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airline.

Oman Air has 5 Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft.

Singapore and Australia’s aviation authorities have also temporarily banned Boeing 737 Max aircraft from flying into and out of their countries.

Singapore’s Changi Airport is the world’s sixth busiest and a major hub connecting Asia to Europe and the US.

No Australian airlines operate the Boeing 737 Max, and only two foreign airlines – SilkAir and Fiji Airways – fly the model into the country.

Shane Carmody, who is in charge of aviation safety at Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority, said the suspension would remain in place while the organisation awaited “for more information to review the safety risks”.

Several airlines and regulators around the world have already grounded the Max 8 model following the crash.

South Korea has asked Eastar Jet, the only airline in the country to own Max 8s, to ground its planes from Wednesday, while Malaysia has banned the jets from its airspace, according to the AFP news agency.

Singapore’s aviation authority said the affected airlines include SilkAir, which operates six Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, as well as China Southern Airlines, Garuda Indonesia, Shandong Airlines and Thai Lion Air.

In the US, the country’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) told airlines on Monday it believes Boeing’s 737 Max 8 model to be airworthy, despite the two fatal crashes.

Southwest, which has the largest fleet of 737s in the US, said it was offering customers booked on flights using the jet the chance to change their reservation, but would not be offering refunds.

Rival American Airlines said its “standard policies for changes still apply”.

The Boeing 737 Max fleet of aircraft are the latest in the company’s successful 737 line. The group includes the Max 7, 8, 9 and 10 models.

By the end of January, Boeing had delivered 350 of the Max 8 model out of 5,011 orders. A small number of Max 9s are also operating.

The Max 7 and 10 models, not yet delivered, are due for roll-out in the next few years.

The Max 8 that crashed on Sunday was one of 30 ordered as part of Ethiopian Airlines’ expansion. It underwent a “rigorous first check maintenance” on 4 February, the airline said.

Following last October’s Lion Air crash in Indonesia, investigators said the pilots had appeared to struggle with an automated system designed to keep the plane from stalling, a new feature of the jet.

It is not yet clear whether the anti-stall system was the cause of Sunday’s crash. Aviation experts say other technical issues or human error cannot be discounted.

US aviation officials have said the 737 Max 8 is airworthy and that it is too early to reach any conclusions or take any action.

With inputs from agencies

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